Fauci Cornered – His Big Secret Revealed

David Morens, Fauci’s 20-year stooge at the NIAID and best friend of EcoHealth Alliance president Dr. Peter Daszak, nearly pissed off Congress this week during his testimony.

There seem to be differences between Morens’ testimony from January and some papers that Congress discovered later.

Congress summoned Morens to Capitol Hill today to inquire why he utilized a Gmail account to circumvent the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) when sharing information about the COVID virus, which we learned originated from a man who consumed bat salad instead of a laboratory.

Rep. James Comer, R-Ky., questioned Morens, and he stammered like Biden at a Girl Scout gathering. As far as he knew, the Congress did its homework.

Morens was exposed for a massive, heinous falsehood. Actually, a few.

“He said he did not talk to Dr. Fauci about EcoHealth and the Institute of Virology in Wuhan, but he did in his emails. He denied using his personal emails for official NIAID or NIH business. Brad Wenstrup, the Republican chairman of the committee, jokingly told the Washington Examiner, “He did.”

After Trump revoked his Wuhan grant in 2020, Morens gave his “best friend” advice on how to reclaim it. He also sought advice from the “FOIA lady” to evade detection.

Morens wrote to NIH officials, “I learned how to make emails disappear from our FOIA lady.”

Below, you can view the heartbreaking testimony. As Congress looks at his emails and boasts about how the “FOIA woman” taught him how to hide his tracks, you can feel his misery.

Laugh as Morens pretends he has no idea what a federal form is (hint: it is any email pertaining to his employment). Watch him squirm as Comer reminds him that deleting federal forms is illegal.

Comer’s email asserting that “Fauci is too smart” to utilize his NIH email for things he does not want to go public makes us laugh.

Author: Steven Sinclaire

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