Google Maps Is RIGGED! Former Employee Leaks Secret

A former UX researcher for Google Maps has provided insight into the company’s reasoning behind excluding a “scenic route” option from its navigation app, citing possible prejudice against communities with lower incomes. The design of a less consumer-friendly product by Google engineers is blatantly reflective of the company’s DEI policy.

According to Toms Guide, Kasey Klimes, a former Senior UX Researcher at Google Maps from 2017 to 2021, explained why the well-known navigation software did not include a scenic route option in a recently removed X/Twitter thread. Klimes contends that the existing Google Maps algorithm is objective, and any change to favor “pleasant” or “scenic” routes would necessitate adding new variables, which would inevitably bring bias into the final output.

Klimes argues that adding these variables could inject an underlying bias into the system, leading users mostly to affluent regions because of the predominance of characteristics like tree-lined streets or stunning architecture. According to Klimes, this prejudice would unintentionally redirect foot traffic from roadways serving lower-class neighborhoods, stealing tax dollars from underprivileged areas and directing them toward affluent ones.

Since then, Klimes has closed his Twitter account and erased the thread, drawing a lot of criticism from people who didn’t agree with his explanations. Some people think that Google may have stepped in to stop former employees from disclosing development secrets, or they understand that if a former employee claims that the company is telling users to walk in areas where there may be more crimes in order to enforce a leftist DEI-influenced belief, there could be a significant backlash.

Rather than adding features that consumers would like to see, Google has sought to incorporate generative AI into the Maps application. In order to better assist customers, the firm has also added a new function that evaluates the ratings of EV charging stations.

With Apple attempting to attract more hikers to its Maps app, Google is facing more and more competition. Users of Apple Maps will be able to build and save trail routes with directions, as well as download them for offline viewing, with the future release of iOS 18. The app will support all 63 U.S. National Parks’ well-known trails.

Author: Scott Dowdy

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